SMTP email encryption

Encryption is something we all take for granted today but did you know that SMTP was invented specifically for sending email? Before SMTP, emails were sent directly from the sender to the intended recipient without any type of security, meaning anyone could intercept those messages. With SMTP, however, emails are encrypted before they are ever sent and even if someone manages to intercept the message, they won't be able to read the contents. SMTP uses public/private cryptography to encrypt the data and then sends it across the network. Once the server receives the message, it decrypts it using the private key associated with the receiving address. This means that anyone listening in on the communication would have no idea what was being said.

SMTP email encryption

Encryption is something we all take for granted today but did you know that SMTP was invented specifically for sending email? Before SMTP, emails were sent directly from the sender to the intended recipient without any type of security, meaning anyone could intercept those messages. With SMTP, however, emails are encrypted before they are ever sent and even if someone manages to intercept the message, they won't be able to read the contents. SMTP uses public/private cryptography to encrypt the data and then sends it across the network. Once the server receives the message, it decrypts it using the private key associated with the receiving address. This means that anyone listening in on the communication would have no idea what was being said.

1. STARTTLS

STARTTLS enables a secure connection between SMTP servers and mail clients. This provides authentication between the two entities, allowing users to verify that messages came from the intended sender.

2. TLS/SSL

TLS/SSL allows for encryption through HTTP requests. TLS stands for Transport Layer Security, and SSL stands for Secure Sockets Layer. Both are used to encrypt data while traveling through networks, and they are typically combined together.

3. OpenPGP

OpenPGP (Pretty Good Privacy) was originally designed to allow individuals to send encrypted emails securely. However, it’s now widely used for signing documents and sending attachments. It’s similar to PGP but much simpler, especially for beginners.